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  Saturday, Jul. 15 1:15pm ET
Everett bumps, then head-butts, umpire

BOSTON (AP) -- First, Carl Everett and umpire Ron Kulpa argued about whether the Boston Red Sox star's foot was crossing the inside line of the batter's box.

Then, Everett crossed a different kind of line.

Everett bumped and head-butted Kulpa after being ejected in the second inning Saturday as the Red Sox beat the New York Mets 6-4, capping a testy three-game series.

Carl Everett and Ronald Kulpa
Carl Everett can expect a suspension after going nose to nose with plate umpire Ronald Kulpa, then completely losing his cool.

"He freaked out, or lost his cool, whatever you want to call it," Mets catcher Mike Piazza said.

Everett and Kulpa refused to comment after the game.

Brian Daubach came in for Everett and struck out on a 2-2 pitch, though Everett was charged with the strikeout.

Daubach later played the hero when he hit a three-run homer in the sixth to give the Red Sox a 5-2 lead.

Everett will almost certainly be hit with a stiff penalty. Atlanta manager Bobby Cox is currently serving a five-game suspension, imposed after he appeared to slightly bump umpire Derryl Cousins with his elbow in a July 4 game against Montreal.

Red Sox manager Jimy Williams accused the Mets of setting up the entire confrontation before the game by asking the umpires to check Everett's stance.

"I know it came from the other side," he said. "There's no doubt in my mind."

The Mets had complained Friday night that Everett was standing too close to the plate after Dennis Cook was ejected for plunking him in the shoulder.

But Mets pitcher Mike Hampton said Kulpa acted on his own.

"The umpire was taking it upon himself," he said. "It's his job."

Piazza said Kulpa warned Everett as soon as he got inside the batter's box during his first at-bat.

"The umpire said, 'Carl, you've got to get in the box' before the first pitch," Piazza said. "Then he (Everett) drew a line and said, 'As long as I'm on the line I'm in.'

With a 2-2 count, Kulpa again indicated that Everett's back foot had crossed the line of the batter's box and drew a proper boundary with his foot as Williams jogged out.

But before Williams could get there, Everett and Kulpa had exchanged words, and Everett had been ejected.

"When he was getting upset, I was out of there," Piazza said. "He was not in a good mood. I didn't want to get hit with any of the crossfire."

That's when Everett lost control.

Everett slammed down his helmet, bumped Kulpa and then head-butted him, causing Kulpa to grab the bridge of his nose.

Everett had to be restrained by first base coach Tommy Harper and later by teammate Jose Offerman.

"I was just trying to keep him in the game," Harper said. "But before I could get there he was already gone."

Mets right fielder Derek Bell, a former teammate of Everett's with Houston, came in to try to play peacemaker and was intercepted by New York manager Bobby Valentine.

"He's like a little brother to me," said Bell, who grew up with Everett in Tampa, Fla. "I'm the closest person besides his wife or someone that could calm him down."

Everett tossed a bat and knocked over a water cooler before disappearing into the clubhouse. The All-Star outfielder began the game batting .323 with 24 home runs and 69 RBI.

After the game, Everett walked past reporters carrying his baby boy. The umpires issued a statement that they would not comment, and Kulpa brushed past reporters without acknowledging them at game's end.

Williams declined to comment when asked if he thought Everett's tirade was justified.

"We certainly don't like to see our players ejected," he said.

Williams defended Everett's batting stance, saying his inside foot was on the line, so his stance was legal.

"If your foot's on the line, you're in the box," he said.

Harper added that Everett has had the same stance for years, and it's never been an issue.

"Carl stood there last night," he said.

Daubach's homer came on the first pitch after Hampton (9-6) intentionally walked Nomar Garciaparra to face him.

It also continued a series-long trend of clutch hits by Daubach.

Daubach delivered a game-winning, two-run double in the ninth inning of Boston's 4-3 victory Thursday and had a tying single after nearly brawling with catcher Todd Pratt on Friday.

Ramon Martinez (7-5) got the win, allowing two runs and striking out four in six innings.

Derek Lowe gave up an RBI single to Pratt before getting his 20th save 25 chances.

Game notes
Saturday's victory gave Boston its first home series win since May 8-10 against the Chicago White Sox. ... Piazza, who homered twice Friday, hit a solo shot in the Mets ninth. ... Mets 3B Robin Ventura has been diagnosed with a bruised rotator cuff. He was examined Saturday after being sent back to New York after complaining about persistent soreness in his right shoulder. The Mets said he is likely to go on the disabled list.


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Report: Mets' Hamilton traveled with Clemens after Piazza beaning

Roundup: Mets' Ventura likely candidate for DL

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 ESPN's Rob Dibble and Jayson Stark discuss Carl Everett's tirade.
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 Jimy Williams believes the Mets talked to the umpires before Saturday's game.
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 Mike Piazza explains the incident between Carl Everett and umpire Ron Kulpa.
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 Brian Daubach did not expect to play on Saturday.
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